WHY DRY SHAMPOO IS “BAD” FOR YOUR HAIR

WHY DRY SHAMPOO IS “BAD” FOR YOUR HAIR

Dry shampoo is a saviour for many people! For most, “second day” hair is usually not the best. Not to mention the time required in the morning to wash, blow dry and style your hair when dry shampoo can save up to 30 min off your morning routine. But there’s still a big dilemma about whether or not dry shampoo is doing more harm than good. It is no secret many women over-use dry shampoo, which results in scalp dryness, hair loss, and YES even scalp pimples. 

So, is dry shampoo really bad for your hair? The simple answer is no, but it’s not that simple. 

DRY SHAMPOO IS NOT ‘SHAMPOO’

Here’s what you need to know if you use dry shampoo: If you’re spraying product and powders near your scalp, you have to wash it out  at some point.

Dry shampoo does not cleanse your scalp, and should never be used as a substitute for shampoo. It simply works to ‘mask’ and absorb oil and odor. That is what makes your hair look cleaner the next day. But dry shampoo does not get absorbed by the scalp. It is simply designed to coat the scalp and hair, and it needs to be washed out within 2 Days…yes we are putting a time limit on dry shampoo. It should not remain on the scalp for longer than two days.

 

PRODUCT BUILD-UP IS THE REAL PROBLEM

What happens if you don’t wash out dry shampoo? Trouble, that’s what. 

The real problem is when the dry shampoo powders + dirt + oil sit on your scalp for days at a time. Even when brushed out, some of the powder particles will remain on your scalp and hair strands. This will build-up and  irritate your scalp, but it also clogs your hair follicles, which lead to  dermatitis, pimples, scaly patches, and even hair loss. 

So you see, it’s not the dry shampoo that’s bad for your hair, it’s extending the usage period that is bad for your hair…it is not designed to be a substitute for shampoo.

 

Basically what I am trying to say is don’t scare yourself out of using dry shampoo, especially if you’re using something with all natural formulation. It is the best time-saver and is a great way to help train your hair to need less washing. Just make sure you’re using it correctly and not causing product build-up at the roots!

If you have any tips about using dry shampoo, or have experienced problems with dry shampoo before, let us know in the comments below.

 

HERE’S WHAT HAPPENED WHEN I TRIED CO-WASHING

WHAT THOSE PIMPLE-LIKE BUMPS ON YOUR SCALP REALLY ARE

What Those Pimple-Like Bumps on Your Scalp Really Are

What Those Pimple-Like Bumps on Your Scalp Really Are

Zits are always unwelcome no matter where they pop up and are always annoying to deal with. We’re used to seeing them on our face and body but have you ever gotten them on your scalp? These types of zits are way more common than you think.

I asked the girls at kaia HQ if they had ever experienced scalp zits. Half of them admitted to getting them regularly but had never really looked into it. If there’s one good thing about scalp zits,  it’s that you don’t see them, which is probably why they don’t get talked about enough! But that doesn’t mean you should ignore them.

 

They’re More than Just Zits

Scalp zits are actually not zits, but an infection of the hair follicles called folliculitis.

Infection? Sounds really intense, but rest assured, dermatologists say they are very common and is something most of us may experience at some point in our lives.

Researchers from the National Center of Gerontology says it is very easy to misdiagnose folliculitis because it has very similar clinical symptoms to acne. In order to properly diagnose and treat, it’s important to know what they look like.

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Our all-natural dry shampoo transforms your hair and scalp while you sleep. 

How Can You Tell If You Have Folliculitis?

These infections mimic acne but can become little pustules (small bumps that contain fluid or pus). If you feel a bump on your scalp, or have itchiness or soreness, part your hair away and try to get a good look at the area. If it’s on the back of your head, ask a loved one to help you take a look.  Look for small red acne-like bumps with a small ring of inflammation around the hair follicle. They can sometimes also look like a white-headed pimple around the hair follicle.

 

scalp zits treatment

Photo by Pixabay.

 

The Causes

According to a study conducted by the National Center of Gerontology, the most common cause of folliculitis is by staphylococcus aureus (S.a), a type of bacteria found on the scalp. Not only has staphylococcus aureus been proven to cause dandruff but it can also lead to infections when combined with oil on the scalp. A buildup of dead skin cells and excess sebum on the scalp can end up clogging the hair follicle and Staphylococcus bacteria thrives on that. The oilier your scalp is, the more bacteria there will be. Other causes of folliculitis can include viral, fungal, or yeast infections.

 

Here’s How to Avoid It

According to a medical journal by the University of Lübeck, lessening the load of staphylococci bacteria on the scalp is key to avoiding and treating folliculitis.

Controlling oil production on your scalp is also important in order to prevent the Staphylococcus bacteria from growing and causing infections.

TIP: Using an all-natural and aerosol-free dry shampoo overnight will help soak up excess oil on your scalp. However, avoid product build-up and clogging hair follicles by only using dry shampoo 1 to 2 times in between washes. Click here to learn more about how to use dry shampoo the right way.

 

how to treat scalp pimples

Photo by Velizar Ivanov.

 

Here’s How to Treat It

 

1. Apple Cider Vinegar Hair Rinse

I know I say this often, but apple cider vinegar is a truly powerful natural ingredient that helps disinfect the scalp and restore healthy pH levels. Mix equal parts of water and ACV and massage through scalp then rinse. Interested in other ways to use apple cider vinegar? Click here.

 

2. Witch Hazel Toner

Spot treat using an astringent like witch hazel to help dry out the area using a cotton pad or cotton ball. Gently dab on the inflamed area and avoid rubbing the area.

 

3. Tea Tree Oil

Has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties can help treat bacterial infections. Just add one drop of tea tree oil to your shampoo. Avoid using too much as it can cause further irritations.

 

4. Sea Salt Scrub

Gently exfoliating the scalp can reduce product buildup and dead skin cells. Try this easy DIY scalp scrub here.

 

5. Visit your doctor or dermatologist

If nothing seems to be working, you may need a prescription shampoo or a topical product.

 

Did you know about folliculitis? Have you experienced it before? Let us know your experience in the comments below.

 

Feature photo by Gabriela Pereira.

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